Tutorial: Git amend a specific commit

Here is my situation: I had to code a dev that I cut into two different commits. I asked for a review from my team and got feedback on the first commit. I realized I didn’t know how to amend a commit that wasn’t the last one in the git history. I really didn’t want to create a specific commit for this fix, it wouldn’t be clean. I wanted to amend the first commit to have a clean git history. Here is the process I followed to be able to do that successfully :

Start by running an interactive rebase

Select the number of your commit, here we want to modify the commit bac653ad. So I had to run :

git rebase --interactive 'bbc643cd^'

In the default editor, you will have this kind of view :

pick bac653ad fix: first commit
pick ac39035 feat: second commit

Edit the commit you want to modify

Change pick to edit in the line mentioning your commit bac653ad and save your file.

edit bac653ad fix: first commit
pick ac39035 feat: second commit

Now your repository is pointing at the commit you want to modify, so here you can change the files you want in your IDE. Once you are done, you stage your changes and amend the commit like this:

git add . 
git commit --amend

Change the name of the commit if you want, or keep it how it is and save. Then run :

git rebase --continue

Time to push force

Now you can push force :

git push --force

Your changes should have been added to the specific commit you wanted.

Shut out to StackOverflow for helping me solve this problem!

Hope I could help.

Tools I use for this site

  • I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com
  • The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost.
  • The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com).
  • I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop.
  • I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor.
  • All the designs and images are created using canvas.
  • I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes.
  • SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords.
  • To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale.

You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ?

If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form.

NO EXPERIENCE needed!
NO PERFECT English needed!
NO DEGREE needed!
NO AGE limits!

No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community.

Learn more about git with my git cheatsheet

git cheatsheet image

Women in tech

Interviews Women in tech
December 9, 2022Interviews Women in techThis week’s women in tech interview feature Mariam Hussein. Mariam is a 24 years old Software engineer from the UK. She didn’t really plan on working in tech in the beginning, but she ended up getting interested in it to find a stable job in the UK. She went from learning to code static websites by herself, to finishing an official course with Code First Girls and landing her first job. Her visions on : imposter syndrome the place of women, and women of color in tech the personal human growth are very wise and deep. I learned a lot from this interview. Also, Mariam wants to create a platformer for women who want to pivot into tech. If you could help her in any way, don’t hesitate to contact her. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Hi! I’m Mariam. I’m currently 24 and from the UK. I currently work as a Software Engineer at Slalom_build in Manchester after pivoting from my Higher Education Internship in 2022. My current hobbies are gaming on Valorant and content creation. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I wanted to study a PhD but found little to no opportunities to study my chosen field (Industrial Relations between the UK and Japan). While I was studying Labour Markets, there was a huge focus on the digitisation of the workforce and the creation of 3 million new jobs in the UK by 2025 for digital-based roles and industries. I thought to be ahead of the labour curve and to skill myself up in time for this change. I focused on Software Engineering because of the variety of technologies and languages I could learn. It seemed like the best choice because of the constant need for learning and development, which are areas I love. However, when I started to learn to code and apply it to websites and designs, I found that I really enjoyed the problem-solving and creative aspects of coding and software development. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I initially was self-taught through FreeCodeCamp and went on to do YouTube tutorials and build a GitHub portfolio. In January 2022, I took my first official coding class with Code First Girls in web development and went on to take their 3-month full-stack bootcamp. I’m currently a year into my learning journey and have been constantly learning real-life application of my technical skills in my current job at Slalom_build Manchester. How is it to find a job in tech? I was very fortunate to have had a sponsored place on the Code First Girls bootcamp to have a role with my sponsor, Slalom_build Manchester after I finished my Course. However, in the UK, there are quite a few opportunities to do Apprenticeships, Sponsored roles or general job searching to find entry level developer roles. I won’t lie and say it’s easy, as I have friends who have had to do many applications and interviews to land their first role. However, once you get your first role, it becomes much easier to find other roles and develop in your current workplace too. The recruitment and interview process varies from each company, but it’s likely you’ll have to do a take-home assignment and explain your solutions/code to your interviewer. You may have to explain why you’ve done it in certain ways and touch upon if there’s better approaches. The other focus in job finding is that you’ll be asked on how you work in a team and approach problems/conflict. This is so important if you’re aiming to work in tech as a Project Manager, Developer or other technical roles as projects are always a group effort. Within my own Code First Girls interviews, the focus was very much on my professional and team-working experience as they knew the bootcamp will further brush up on my technical skills. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Imposter Syndrome is a very constant feeling even before I started my tech job. I think everyone has a form of imposter syndrome and will often mask it in the workplace. But I do think that since working in tech, the feelings of imposter syndrome has increased a lot as my own role is dependent on *how* much I know and can apply to projects. When you’ve recently switched into a new industry, it’s often that you’ll come across a huge learning curve and will be playing catch up. It was very frequent that I’d be comparing myself to Engineers who have been working in the field for 10-20+ years, whereas I’ve only realistically been working as an Engineer for 3 months now. I used to let the imposter syndrome eat me up and I’d often become very depressed about it. However, a key tip given to me by a colleague is that I should be comparing myself to my past self rather than others. A year ago I was barely understanding HTML and building static websites, but now a year later I’m able to test complex Lambda functions as part of a Serverless AWS API. Even when I say that out-loud, I still can’t believe that the jump in my technical ability has been so big in just a year. The key thing with being an Engineer is that you’re only in competition with one person, and that is *yourself*. Rather than looking around or above you, I would recommend to look behind at your past self instead. Document the projects you’ve worked on, make lists of all the work compliments given to you in meetings or projects, and you’ll find that over time, your technical ability has expanded greatly. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? At my current workplace, I feel like there’s a substantial amount of minority representation and support for women of colour. They often give the space for minority groups to celebrate and educate their peers on their respective traditions and holidays. As an example, in Slalom_build UK, we had a huge Diwali celebration where we had henna stalls, amazing food and dance demonstrations. There is a huge focus on uplifting people of colour and we have dedicated support networks and events for women and women of colour. However, I do know women of colour at other companies have faced micro-aggression and even been tasked with admin work even though it isn’t part of their *Engineering Role*. Some have had to plan parties, take notes and have been talked down upon at their workplaces. Although these may be rare instances, it’s important to note that it’s important to speak up and to create a community of women and women of colour to share those experiences with. I’m fortunate that Code First Girls have created a community of women who share their experiences and provide support for one another for this. What do you like about your job? Honestly, the people in my workplace are amazing. The amount of patience, support and care they’ve put into helping me has been so impactful. Even from when I was studying how to be a full-stack Engineer with Code First Girls, people at Slalom_build checked ins with me weekly and had drop-in sessions at their office to help me with understanding fundamentals. At my job now, we have regular events we plan together and have opportunities to bond and really grow together as a team. The other part to this is that my workplace focus on impactful and meaningful work. Whenever I’m working on a project, it’s always helping a business transform itself with the latest stacks and meaningful technologies. That feeling of fulfilment and connection has what made me love working at Slalom_build. Are you happy with your career choice? 100%.I used to mourn the fact I couldn’t do a PhD, but I think working in tech has shown me I still have opportunities to grow and change. You meet so many people who have not had degrees, high school education or switched from a 20+ career to work in tech. If that’s taught me anything, it’s the fact that you’re not limited by your once choice for the rest of your life. I’m only in my early 20s and I still have time to change and even go back to doing a PhD if I want to. Working in tech has taught me that you should never stop growing and learning, even as a full-grown adult. How do you expect to grow in the future? My focus right now is on giving back and supporting women, and women of colour, on getting into tech. Even though my workplace has amazing representation, there’s still lots of places where there are either no or only one woman in their tech workplaces. I want to cost on promoting the importance of digital skilling to women who want to go into technical/non-technical roles and supporting them with opportunities such as Code First Girls. As a woman of colour, I know we sometimes get as much support in career changing or taking on a more technical role. I want to create a platform and voice for those who want to pivot into tech and to become digital leaders. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Be kind to yourself. Going into tech is not a competition as there’s so many women who are also going through the same thing. The only competition is between you and your past self, so focus on growing and building your connections through your journey. I’d say to find a huge community of women to work with. There’s a lot of organisations out there like Code First Girls, SheCodes, Girl in Tech, Women Who Code, Girls Who Code, Stemettes, and so much more. If you’re able to find people to check-in with and to even work on a project together, it’ll help your growth and development ten-fold as tech isn’t just about your technical ability but also your inter-personal skills. If you want to follow Mariam here is her LinkedIn and tiktok : Linkedin Link If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
January 7, 2022Interviews Women in tech / Women in techA few months after starting the series of interviews Women Experience in tech, we are featuring our 11th tech queen. This number is dedicated to Ainul. She is a Software Developer from Singapore. But that’s not all. Ainul is also a content creator on social media. She publishes great videos with amazing tech-related content. You know what you have to do now after reading this article. Her socials are linked at the end of her interview. I’m very happy with all the profiles we had discovered through these interviews. And I can’t wait to continue sharing the experience of more women in tech around the world. Once again, I want to remind you that every experience matters. From the student to the senior developer, the self-thought to the Ph.D. expert. So if you want to be a part of this experience don’t forget to check the form below the article. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? I am a Software Developer in ThoughtWorks, as well as coding & tech content creator @ainlovescode! I was born, studied, and work in Singapore. My ultimate goal is to set up a scholarship fund for future women and girls in tech, as well as be known all over the world for creating code and tech content. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I became interested in coding after trying to build a webpage and realized that becoming a Software Developer not only allows me to build the future with code, but also get paid well. How did you learn your technical skills? I studied Information Systems at university. How is it to find a job? I was already networking, building a tech portfolio, and polishing my resume from my second year in university. It was a bit easier for me to find a job and get interviews by leveraging my career network for referrals and advice. I was able to get a job offer in 2019, two semesters before I graduated. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, I definitely experience impostor syndrome as a content creator and software developer. I always feel like I get left behind and that I started too late. What had helped me always get back on track and focus is by asking for feedback and advice from other people, and doing a lot of self-reflection to see where I can improve. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Someone told me that his male friends complained they were not able to get jobs due to “women in tech” being favored over men. In reality, women still make a minority of tech leadership positions and lack positive representation in mainstream media. We still have a long way to go to achieve gender equality in tech, but it is never at the expense of the traditionally privileged. What do you like about your job? I feel empowered that I am contributing to the growth of our digital future by writing code. Are you happy with your career choice? I am happy with my career choice and especially excited about the many pathways I can further my career in. How do you expect to grow in the future? I aim to become a full-stack software developer, hopefully with a few published apps that promote community service, better access to coding education, and diversity in tech. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Don’t overthink a detailed tech career plan – get started now because you can always figure it out as you progress and meet new mentors and friends in tech. Follow Ain through her social medias TikTok Instagram LinkedIn If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience Read other interviews [...]
December 2, 2022Interviews Women in techWelcome to this new women in tech interview featuring Yara Debian. Yara is a young Lebanese woman working as a software engineer in Barcelona. Yara is a fighter, her story gave me goosebumps because I can relate. My parents are from Algeria, and all my family lives there, so I know the conditions for women in these countries. When a woman wants to be independent and strong, she’s never taken seriously. But Yara did it, and she wants to tell the world that IT CAN BE DONE!! Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Hello! I’m Yara Debian, a 25 years old woman from Lebanon. I recently moved to Barcelona for a fresh start in tech and life. I’m a software engineer at Factorial. If I’m not coding I enjoy walking around the city while listening to podcasts or cooking comfort meals and eating them while watching tv shows. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I was always fascinated by science and how far can it get for humanity’s development. In my country science fields are not an investing target and any science major will lead to teaching which is not in my interest. Programming and becoming a software developer was satisfying this interest all with the safety and good pay it provides. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I majored in computer and communication engineering and decided to focus my senior year on software elective courses so I can land a job. How is it to find a job in tech? It’s really relative to your needs. Finding remote jobs has become the easiest way to go although sometimes the requirements seem to be unrealistic when it comes to years of experience and stack. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? I suffer from imposter syndrome when I’m facing a new challenge, and this happened to me more often than I was expecting the past 2 years. From starting a job right before the Beirut explosion and quitting it to starting a new one and then leaving my birth country to start a new life. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Not being taken seriously is the main uncomfortable situation I was put in. My goal of leaving the country and living abroad was too ambitious for a girl in the middle east. Adding to that, having people surprised when I tell them I’m a programmer is a big prejudice as if appearances define interests. What do you like about your job? The opportunities my job offers are limitless. Starting with working conditions where I get to work remotely and with a flexible schedule. Also, the community and culture I’m surrounded by help me to bloom and give my best potential. Are you happy with your career choice? Of course. It changed my life. How do you expect to grow in the future? I want to be a reference when it comes to Lebanese girls seeking advice for a career in tech. I want to show them that it’s possible. Yes, a girl from the middle east in 2022 can be independent and strong by herself. No excuses. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? “The opportunities are limitless. Choose what suits you best and set your mind to it. It could positively change your life!” Would you like to share anything else? After moving to Barcelona and telling my story to people I met at a language exchange gathering I became to the realization that what I’ve been through needs to be shared with the world and inspire other women. If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
October 14, 2022Interviews Women in techThis edition of women in tech series features Olatokunbo Ogunlade. She is a self-taught System engineer from Lagos Nigeria since 2019. Her story is very inspiring, I can’t wait for you to read it. Olatokunbo gives me some hope, brilliantly transitioning from the role of Front-end engineer to Cloud engineer. Being a Front-end developer myself, I feel that everything back-end related or cloud is very hard to understand. The moral: everything is possible when you put your head into it. It doesn’t matter your age, your gender, your background, your origins, or where you live… You can do everything and be anyone you dream of. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? I am Olatokunbo Ogunlade from Lagos Nigeria. I work as a Systems Engineer at Factorial HR, where I deploy, secure and support cloud infrastructure solutions to meet application developer requirements. I am also the founder of The Coding Mum, a community that supports mothers to break into theTech market. I am a graduate of Computer Science from the Olabisi Onabanjo University,Nigeria. I started my Software Engineering journey in 2018 as an intern after transitioning from being a Stay-at-home Mum. By 2019, became a Front end Engineer and Later transitioned into Cloud Engineering. I am committed to creating a coding culture that seeks to increase women and children participation. For fun ,I love to dance! What motivated you to work in a tech field? Financial freedom was what motivated me to start a career in Tech. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I learnt on codecademy.com How is it to find a job in tech? The most important thing about getting a job in tech is to build projects and being visible. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? A lot! I felt like i was too old to belong in Tech. I then realised that age had nothing to do with the value I had and how valuable was to any team. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? It truly can be lonely being the “only one in the room”. There was a time that I was in a Sprint planning session as a front-end engineer, and a senior engineer from another team (that didn’t know me) asked me why I wasn’t taking the minutes of the meeting! He assumed that since I was the only lady in the room, I must be the Engineering Director’s assistant! What do you like about your job? I love the freedom I have to create! I also love the financial freedom I also have. Are you happy with your career choice? Absolutely! How do you expect to grow in the future? Learning new Technologies and embracing bigger challenges! What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Every woman/girl deserves a spot in Tech! If you want to follow Olatokunbo here is her LinkedIn: Linkedin If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 1, 2022Interviews Women in techLet us continue on this amazing journey through the stories of women in tech. In this new interview, we discover the experience of Marsha Castello, a Data Analyst from London. She shares a lot of details about her motivation and her vision of the tech industry. I definitely enjoyed working on this interview, and I hope you will love it.  Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Hello, I’m Marsha Castello, I hold a MSc. International Business and Development from the University of London, alongside PRINCE2 Practitioner and APM Project Management certification. I am passionate about emerging ethical and sustainable technologies, and AI and technological innovation. I currently work in Data Analysis. I enjoy Sci-Fi movies and literature, the theatre, ballet, live music, music festivals, fitness and pilates. I recently completed a Microsoft Azure and Python Bootcamp, where I achieved IT Specialist certification in Python and Microsoft Azure Fundamentals. I hope to take the Microsoft Azure Developer Associate exam later this year after already sitting the taught classes. With the Bootcamp, I discovered a love for both Python and Cloud Computing and I am now studying several follow up complimentary courses, including Code First Girls Introduction to Data & SQL and Code First Girls Introduction to Python & Apps. I am also completing Avado’s Data Analyst Advanced Skills Bootcamp to formally train in this area. The courses I am completing are covering similar subjects so compliment and work as revision for each other. SQL is very easy to learn especially as I now have experience with Python, and Python is a language you can do so much with so there’s always an opportunity to learn more. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I have always had a profound love of technological innovation and Sci-Fi movies from as early as I could remember! I grew up on Star Wars and Star Trek and I am now a massive Marvel movie fan! What I love about such movies is the way they display the limitless bounds of technology, and how concepts and innovations that start off as fiction can often be brought to life by a tech genius somewhere. For example, the iPad and metaverse were introduced as Sci-Fi concepts and have been brought to life I love the possibilities of tech and using tech for social good. For example we’re moving from unnecessary invasive surgery towards microscopic capsules containing cameras you can swallow to give your surgeon internal photographs. Drones that deliver medicines and food packages to compromised regions. AI and Machine Learning which can teach computer models to problem solve and forecast with a few lines of code, and Cloud technologies which can expand out and up and contract in and down with demand to maximise efficiency fascinate me. There is so much in tech to be fascinated by and in awe of. I love feeling like a magician as lines of my own code transform on the terminal! How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I first learnt Python and Azure with Firebrand Python Software Engineer Bootcamp and I am now consolidating and expanding my knowledge with Avado’s Data Analyst Advanced Skills Bootcamp, as sponsored by BT, and Code First Girls Kickstarter courses. All have flexible online taught classes alongside required pre-reading, homework and either projects and/or exams. I have found that reading the required documentation and then bringing this to life with YouTube videos and other courses on Udemy and FreeCodeCamp really brings the subject alive for me and consolidates my knowledge. YouTube is a tremendous resource as are Udemy, Coursera, DataCamp, FreeCodeCamp and similar platforms. How is it to find a job in tech? There are some lay-offs in the tech sector at present, but as the sector is so vast there is always demand in some areas of tech. Do your research thoroughly about tech roles in demand in your desired location and areas of interest. Plus a recession means there will be layoffs across industries, so having a greater combination of diverse skills is a great way to stay in demand in these times. There’s a future coming where every job role will require some form of technological knowledge and experience and you could argue that it’s already here. Which is why I feel up-skilling in tech and continuous learning in this field is essential. There are so many opportunities to work in the tech field now, but there is also always fierce competition as there are so many talented and inspirational individuals in the tech field. This means the application process can be challenging as it is meant to be in order to sift through so many talented candidates. But there are also many success stories and no reason, with the right time and dedication that one of those success stories couldn’t be you! Securing a mentor will help you to navigate this. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Imposter syndrome is such a buzz phrase right now and essentially is a crisis of confidence which I feel if we’re all honest everyone has experienced, which is why it’s such a popular concept. I find that the concept itself though is not always helpful and can instil fear – the word ‘imposter’ is disempowering. Its important to realise that everyone feels like this. You are not an imposter you are in the learning/growth zone. I saw a fantastic quote on LinkedIn: “ If you weren’t ready, you wouldn’t have the opportunity, If you weren’t capable, you wouldn’t have the desire” What has worked for me is the concept of feeling the fear and doing it anyway, definitely check out a book: Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway – by Susan Jeffers. Embrace the fact that everyone feels this way at some point. We fear that which we think we don’t know, so the trick is to practice, practice, practice until you master your craft. Fear often exists in the growth zone when you are learning something new, or are in an environment where you fear others know more than you so be compassionate with yourself as you learn, learn from others, be inspired, all while having faith that you can only improve from where you are as long as you keep going. Embrace the challenge and keep going! How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Finding a community is vital – this is a safe space to share and validate your experiences with people similar to you and/or on similar journeys to you. I’m a part of a lovely women in tech mentoring and networking group called Cajigo run by Rav Bumbra. We are assigned a mentor, and also peer mentor and learn from each other and other incredible mentors on the program. I have expanded my network at least 10 fold and now always have someone to go to if I have a query. I have learned from this and gained the confidence to expand my network even further everywhere I go, which includes the courses, bootcamps and associated events I go to and at work too! By building a community of support you also build a safe space where you are no longer in the minority and that is essential to offset spaces where you you may feel that you are. It builds confidence and awareness of opportunities. It is also important to believe that everyone has something valuable to contribute, everyone has a lesson teach those that look like you and those that don’t, everyone has a lesson to teach and an invaluable perspective to impart and that includes you. What do you like about your job? What I love most about my current job is I have a lovely supportive and fun team and an opportunity to work with data and the associated data and business intelligence tools such as Power BI. I hope to find such teams, and support every where I go. What I love about my learning path is the opportunity to learn something new everyday and to continue to be inspired and invigorated and on the cusp of endless possibilities. Are you happy with your career choice? Well I’m currently expanding my options by Up-skilling as a Software Engineer, I also have an interest in Data Science, so my Data Analyst experience will always be invaluable. With the rise in digital tools and technologies – the data trails these leave – and the abundance of data created (We are generating approximately 2.5 quintillion bytes of data each day!), every organisation and eventually every role will be shaped by data insights and analysis. Data skills will always be invaluable which is why I have chosen to also continue my learning in this field. How do you expect to grow in the future? I am aiming to specialise in Python and Cloud technologies and use my transferable skills in data to realise my aspirations as a Software Engineer in Cloud, or DevOps. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Start where you are and go for it. There are wonderful organisations especially for women offering free courses, such as Code First Girls and SheBuilds. So you lose nothing by trying out one of these courses or a few to find an area you are passionate about and there is so much to be passionate about and in awe of in tech, so it won’t take you long. Yes learning something new is hard and daunting and takes time particularly in programming/coding. You will suffer from “imposter syndrome” initially and at different points along your path, but remember there is a learning curve with everything and you can only get better, with practice. You will also surprise yourself with your capabilities and realise it’s not as difficult as you originally thought. A career in tech can be life changing, give yourself that chance. Everything is also easier with a strong network/community and mentor so ensure that you find these. Cajigo is a great place to start. Also reach out to people in tech on LinkedIn and at tech networking events. Would you like to share anything else? Tech is amazing, the scope is endless because tech powers everything we do and consume so there are multiple fields within tech to be inspired by and in be awe of and multiple avenues in which to use tech for social good and that should also mean that there is a place for everyone to contribute their skills and vision. Investing in yourself yields the highest return and is never time wasted. The time will pass anyway so start where you are and continue to grow. In an uncertain future with a recession on the horizon it is also essential to future proof your career and skill set, tech is recession proof, transferable and global as it only continues to grow and evolve which is one of the very reasons it’s so awe inspiring. Good luck and remember to start where you are, you probably have an abundance of transferable skills which will propel you forward in this field. Find your superpower and utilise that. If you want to follow Marsha here is her LinkedIn: Linkedin If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
October 30, 2022Interviews Women in techI’m happy to publish a new interview in this special series, women in tech. Let me introduce to you Bukola Bisuga, a 27 years old Software engineer from Lagos, Nigeria. Another amazing woman, self-taught and very involved in the community. I can’t believe how many women out there are just rocking it in the tech industry. I’m impressed by all these badass women. I am very proud to be part of this community. Enjoy the interview. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? I’m Bukola Bisuga. I’m 27 and I’m from Lagos, Nigeria. Currently, I work as a Software Engineer at Microsoft on Microsoft Mixed Reality team. I enjoy taking long walks, watching a good movie/show, and spending time with loved ones. I have a passion for organizing and teaching, so I joined She Code Africa as a Technical Coordinator. I love that I have the opportunity to giveback and help other women get started in their tech careers. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I was motivated by all the tech innovation that was happening in the world. Mobile apps, robotics and other new technology quickly became an integral part of our lives and society. I wanted to be a part of that and contribute in my own way. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I have a BSc degree in Geophysics from the University of Lagos, Nigeria. I started teaching myself how to code in June of 2017. When I knew I had developed an interest in tech, I decided to pursue online & onsite courses to help me improve my learning. How is it to find a job in tech? It can be quite challenging. I had no friends/network in tech when I started out. Community and networking are very important in tech, so I joined twitter and She Code Africa to grow my network and increase my access to opportunities. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Many times in my career (especially early on) I have felt under-equipped. Mostly because I believed I lacked the foundational knowledge of computer science. Even recently, when I struggle to learn/understand concepts and fundamentals, I feel like – maybe I don’t belong here. But I’m beginning to understand that the feeling means I’m breaking a barrier and achieving things outside my comfort zone. I’m learning to embrace it and use it to my advantage. That way, I can learn more and do better. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I’ve have had a couple of scenarios, where I knew – “this wouldn’t have happened to me if I were male”. I won’t go into details but I think the most important thing is to not dwell on but instead, learn from them. These kind of situations are why you MUST succeed as a woman in tech – to help other women and do your part to ensure they don’t have to go through the same negative experiences. What do you like about your job? I enjoy learning and using that knowledge to solve new/existing problems. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes, I am. This is probably not the final destination in my career, but I know I’m on the right track. How do you expect to grow in the future? I see myself growing into business/product focused roles. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Don’t let anybody tell you that you can’t – including yourself. Go for it! And even if you don’t succeed at first, you’ll have learnt more about yourself and your journey than if you hadn’t tried at all. If you want to follow Bukola here is her LinkedIn and Twitter: Linkedin Twitter If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 18, 2021Interviews Women in techAliénor is a French senior beck-end developer with an amazing career! I’m impressed by how rich her experience is in only 10 years. On top of that, she is a backend developer! As a frontend developer, I find backend very very very difficult and even scary, so every person who is able to handle it gain my full respect! I love the way she talks about imposter syndrome, you should definitely read more about her experience. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Aliénor, 33, France I’m a senior back-end developer working with Go on cloud services. I have worked in web marketing and communication, satellite imagery processing, and now meal-kit boxes delivery. In less than 10 years I have been a full-stack developer, a cloud software architect, a back-end dev, dabbled in devops, administration and social media content management. I’m also a mother, a dancer, I sew, knit and doodle. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? I was supposed to become a professional musician, but somehow found a backup in computing, and I thoroughly enjoy the number of different things that can be done with code. How is it to find a job? It is harder to not find a job than to find one once you have a LinkedIn profile with “backend” written on it, as recruiters are hard on your trail. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? I don’t feel like a fraud, I tend to feel like a shy beginner who always needs to prove everything she says with concrete sources from the web. Note that the guys who published the sources have probably less experience than I do. So it’s more about feeling legitimate. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? My first week at one job ended with a demo to the client, via a video call. 3 clients, men. 14 people on our side, of which 13 were men. A dick joke. The client laughs. Perfectly normal. That same person had rejoiced to finally have a secretary, as a welcome (I was his direct colleague), and asked if I could make coffee. The list is long. What do you like about your job? I like having a job that is creative, uses most of my brain resources (that changes from school!), pushes me to learn new things every day, and lets me explore. No repetition. It is possible to get bored, but it is easy to do something about it. Are you happy with your career choice? Definitely. How do you expect to grow in the future? I want to become a team leader again, but not a manager, as I want to become a technical expert too. We’ll see. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Go for it. It’s the best thing you can do for yourself and for the world. And whenever the mood is not comfortable, either change the way people interact or leave. You don’t have to suffer the locker room talk. If you want to follow Aliénor here is her LinkedIn : LinkedIn If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience [...]
December 30, 2021Interviews Women in techOur 10th woman to share her experience in the series of interviews Women in tech is Marie. She is a 27 years old Product Owner working in Paris. It is crazy because she graduated from the same school as me, and we are the same age, so we probably met a few times back then. However, I feel like it’s been ages since my student’s life, and I definitely can’t recall her. I am happy to discover her experience because for a time I thought about choosing the same degree as she did. However, I ended up going for Computer Networks and Multimedia Communication instead of Health Information technologies. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? My name is Marie, I’m 27 years old and I’m based in Paris. After graduating from Polytech’ Grenoble with an engineering degree in health information technologies, I started my career as a project manager at Ennov, a software company specializing in life sciences, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. After three and a half years of project management, I wanted to move into a more technical field and get closer to development. I was promoted to Product Owner in the R&D department, still at Ennov in September this year. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? To be honest, in high school, I wasn’t sure what career to chose and I was given a brochure for a chemistry school. It looked interesting so I decided to do a math prep course to get into that kind of school. I ended up in the computer science/medical field. I realize now that it is one of the most promising fields I know, thanks to the increasing digitalization of the world around us. How did you learn your technical skills? I did an advanced course of 2 years in biology/physics/earth sciences and math. Then I learned programming, medicine and project management at the engineering school. My first job allowed me to consolidate my skills in project management, consulting, design and data model. Now I focus on the specifications and the organization of the development of a product. How is it to find a job? I found my first job very easily, less than a month after graduation. I think that the network plays a big role in this sector. My manager, who hired me, is an alumnus of my school. I also get a lot of offers via LinkedIn. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? I’ve read a lot of articles on this topic before and I can’t say I didn’t recognize myself. When I was a child, “being an engineer” was surreal and really hard, I often wonder if I really am or if I just got lucky. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Yes, completely. I work in an open space that is 80% male. One day, while we were all women in a room eating, someone (a guy obviously) opened the door and asked if it was the towel and tea towel meeting. No one knew what to say. Another day, when I had to go to Germany for a customer workshop with my manager, he asked me to be friendly and smile. And that was it. I often have the impression that we are less considered as women. What do you like about your job? I like to solve problems, mostly. I can spend hours on a mystery, I won’t stop until I have the solution. I like to be autonomous and alone in front of my computer. Are you happy with your career choice? Sometimes yes, sometimes no… Sometimes I regret not to have taken a more “human” branch, in the life sciences. But sometimes I think I chose well when I see the growth of the technology industry. How do you expect to grow in the future? I hope to continue learning, working on innovative projects with interesting and competent people. Maybe I will become an expert in a field if I find one in particular that I really like. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Go for it ! If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience Read other interviews [...]
November 28, 2021Interviews Women in techOur fifth woman to be featured in this series of interviews women in tech is Donia Chaiehloudj, a backend software engineer from France. Donia was the first one to follow my page on LinkedIn, and she always reacts to my posts. To be honest, sometimes she is the only one to react. You know, I dedicate a lot of time to creating content I think could be useful for people. Nevertheless, these last weeks had been very hard on me because some days my website gets only 2 views, knowing that one is mine. A little depressing. I was starting to think that maybe I should give up. Then, I received one very sweet message of support from a person I didn’t even know, and this message made up for all my negativity and gave me the strength to keep going on. Hint: That message was from Donia. Enough about me now, we are here to discover the experience of Donia. Note that she is starting to develop her website, so don’t hesitate to follow her to learn more about her publications. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Donia, 28 years old, Back-end Software Engineer. I am a software engineer, currently transitioning from Thales Alenia Space to a startup called Powder. I have worked with Go and cloud tech. And I love it. I have been working in satellite image processing and control center for satellites. I have been a QA engineer at the beginning of my career, but I did not find enough challenges, so I changed as a backend developer 3 years ago. When I am AFK, you can find me dancing, sewing or hiking. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? I kind of always knew that I wanted to be in the STEM universe, but it took me a few years to determine that IT engineering was really my thing. How did you learn your technical skills? I learn a lot from my peers and from the incredible resources on the internet! How is it to find a job? Easy. Finding an interesting one is harder. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, all the time!! I did not even begin my new job at Powder and I already feel like an imposter. I guess it will disappear in a few months when I will handle the domain. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? At Thales, I thought for a few weeks that they hired me only because I am a female. That is one among others. What do you like about your job? I do not get bored. I love to craft software, refactor and create something. Are you happy with your career choice? YES How do you expect to grow in the future? After landing on Developer relations and Developer Advocate offers, it became my new goal. I am currently building my website and writing one article per month. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Go go go! You will not be disappointed by the plethora of domains and offers. Also, it can really be well paid. Follow Donia through these platforms: LinkedInMediumDev.to If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience [...]
October 14, 2022Interviews Women in techWhen we think about inspiring women in tech, I believe Bukola Johnson is a great example. She was encouraged by Aliénor and Donia to submit her story. Two amazing women who have already been featured in this series of interviews. I totally understand why they wanted her to. Thanks to her, I will add two entities to my Women in tech communities and organizations list: ShecodeAfrica and Google Womentech Makers. So much to learn from her. Enjoy her story! Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My name is Bukola Johnson, I am a Platform Engineer at Hellofresh, a Nigerian , based in Germany. I am passionate about solving problems with technology and bringing change and Inclusion into Tech. As someone that is interested in increasing the visibility of women in technology. I volunteer at SheCodeAfrica as a DevOps coordinator where I mentor ladies interested in moving into cloud/DevOps. I am also an ambassador for Google Womentech Makers (WTM) program and a co-organizer at the WTM Berlin Chapter. When I am not doing all the techy and mentoring stuff , you can find me sewing simple outfits for myself as I learned how to sew awhile back. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I actually studied computer science and started working in tech right after school , I started as a Helpdesk support staff almost 15 years ago when I did my internship and that was how I got interested to know more about it as I saw tech as a problem-solving field. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) Mostly self taught and learning on the job. I learn using resourcing online, for me the best way I learn is by using video resources and official documentation. How is it to find a job in tech? I would say its pretty easy to find a tech job once you have the right skills needed for the job. Because Tech is in high demand and there are a lot of opportunities to explore in this space. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? I don’t like to call it imposter syndrome because thats a strong combination of words always used for women but in the real sense I think everyone have a felling of anxiety or uncertainty at some point in their life or career . For example, joining a new team, learning a new skill , or speaking at an event, one might feel a little anxious but we overcome that as time passes by . So YES I feel this too but I don’t let it stop me. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Been the only woman in the team is part of what made me joined community where I can help to bring inclusion into the tech . I don’t feel uncomfortable though but I was just curious why women don’t come into tech , so I wanted to be a part of the women that will change that narrative and we are already doing that. What do you like about your job? I love the fact that we keep learning , there is always something new to learn and you have to keep updating yourself to stay up to date with technologies. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes absolutely love what I do , I wouldn’t have wished for a different path. How do you expect to grow in the future? In the future I will love to focus on developer relations , building communities and helping more women in tech . i already started doing this as I find so much joy in it. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? I would say – Never give up , be self motivated , That is one thing that keeps me going . And don’t be afraid to ask for help. Would you like to share anything else? I just will like to say thank you to The Trendy Coder for this awesome work in featuring women in tech and thank you to my friends Donia and Aliénor for telling me about this. If you want to follow Bukola here are her Twitter, LinkedIn, and personal website : Twitter Linkedin Wordpress If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 17, 2022Interviews Women in techLet me start with one thing. I am beyond impressed by the women sharing their stories on this interview series “Women in tech”. And the story of Dorothy Akoth represents all the things I want women to be. Never give up. Have the determination to succeed. Dream about changing your life. Be ambitious. Have resilience. Dorothy lives in Kenya. She went from selling second hand clothes to being a software developer. I could tell you more about her, but I prefer to let you read her story with her own words. Note: Dorothy enrolled to be a guest writer on the blog. I’m very happy and proud to be working with such an incredible woman. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My name is Dorothy Akoth, Software Developer based in Nairobi, Kenya and a former graduate of Information Technology from AkiraChix, currently contributing to open source project as a Junior Back-end Developer at Ersilia Initiative Open Source. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I got motivated back in 2019 when I enrolled in a computer packages training at a nearby Cyber shop in my hometown Kisumu City from the money I got by selling second hand clothes after high school. After 3 months of computer training I was employed to train other students and I really find this interesting since I had time to interact with other students too. My dream was not only to work in a computer shop and selling second hand clothes but one day to be a software developer, meet other inspiring women in tech and work in a Tech Company. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) In 2020 during Covid , I started self learning on basic fundamentals of Html, CSS. Two months later I applied for LakeHub Academy training cohort5 but didn’t qualify , I did not give up on applying for the next cohort. I was among the accepted applicants. The training was for 6 months hands-on basic training in Html, Css and JavaScript and for sure I gained a lot which prepared me for other training software development courses and participated in a Hackathon at LakeHub . 2021, I was lucky to be among the applicants who qualified for AkiraChix scholarship, AkiraChix is a one-year fully sponsored residential hands-on technical training program . From the AkiraChix program I gained a lot not only in coding in Python , Django JavaScript but also meeting some amazing women in Tech like Linda Kamau, Marie Githinji of AkiraChix, DorCas Owinoh of LakeHub, Joylyn Kirui of Microsoft Kenya, Siobhan O Baker Speaker for Coding Black Females, Confidence Staveley of Cyber Foundation and many more I also attended community event like GDG, Women TechMakers and speaking at event like the one I did with Coding Black Females. How is it to find a job in tech? It took me 3 months to land my first job as a software developer after sending my applications to over 20 companies and luckily I got my first job as a software intern after my graduation. I can say networking plays a big role in this sector. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, but I am avoiding it. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I find it hard because you have to prove yourself twice as much as men . But as an experienced software developer both women and men are equal because what he’s capable of doing is what I’m capable of doing too. What do you like about your job? I love to debug codes and analyzing Back-end data, the challenges that I get when debugging and team work are what I like most about my job. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes!! I am very happy with my career choice. How do you expect to grow in the future? I hope to continue learning in my chosen career path of Back end Development through working on personal projects, contributing to open source projects, enrolling into online courses and working on innovative projects with competent people in the industry. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Setting your goals right and putting more effort towards it. If you want to follow Dorothy here is her LinkedIn, github and Twitter: Linkedin Github Twitter If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed! NO PERFECT English needed! NO DEGREE needed! NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 10, 2022Interviews Women in techThis new number of the women in tech series features Hena Naranbhai. Hena is a 41 years old Program Manager based in the UK. She is very passionate about opening STEM opportunities to young girls, and we can only encourage this goal. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My Name is Hena Naranbhai, I’m 41 years old, born in the UK but of South Asian heritage. I’m am a Programme Manager for Barclays Bank working in Risk, Finance and Treasury Technology. I’m a qualified Accountant and moved in to projects after the birth of my first child 8 years ago before moving from Finance in to Technology 5 years ago. My hobbies are cooking, organising kids activities and yoga. What motivated you to work in a tech field? I found myself in Technology after an organisation restructure now it excites me and the opportunities available. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) On the job training. How is it to find a job in tech? Currently the market is active, just from the organisation that I work for there are 100’s of open roles. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, I was very ambitious when I was younger. Always told too ambitious, because of it I now doubt myself. I’m in the process of exploring an opportunity at the moment, and this opportunity came up 18 months ago. It’s a role I know I can do. 18 months ago I didn’t feel ready. Currently, I’m still doubting if I’ll get through the process. Can I do the role? What if I’m not good enough? How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Being a minority isn’t the ideal position but an opportunity to encourage and support the next generation. I’m really passionate about opening STEM opportunities for my daughter and other little girls. I am looking at opportunities to give back through mentorship. What do you like about your job? Problem solving and no two days are the same. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes. How do you expect to grow in the future? Cajigo have really opened up the possibilities of opportunity for me both internally in Barclays and externally. I need to think carefully about my medium term goals and then align to sponsor who will support me. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? It may feel scary, but find your supporters, create a group of women who will provide you with sound advice and will support you. Would you like to share anything else? The other challenge I’ve had is that I’m dyslexic which I didn’t find out about until I was 20. If you want to follow Hena here is her LinkedIn and Instagram : Linkedin Instagram If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 17, 2021Interviews Women in techToday, in the first number of the series women in tech interviews, let’s get to know more about my dear colleague Layla. Layla is working at the same company as me, Norsys, but overseas, in Morocco. We got to work in the same team for a few months, it was definitely a pleasure to work with Layla. She is smart, helpful, sweet, gentle, and the list can go on and on… I’m so happy to start by sharing her experience and story! Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My name is Layla, I’m 27 yo. I’m from Morocco and I work as an engineer in a company based in Marrakesh for 4 years now. I love hiking and knitting and traveling and discovering new places and meeting new people. What motivated you to study and work in a tech field? I always loved mathematics and algorithmic, so I got to an engineering school. The first two years were all about Mathematics, physics, and all basics, then, I had to make a choice that felt close to my interests, and it wasn’t hard to choose. How is it to find a job? Fortunately, I work in a company that values women and that wants to have equitable gender representation. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? A big yes, no matter how confident I am with my skills, a little comment may just make me doubt myself. Sometimes, I wonder if am I even qualified to do this? (but, I do it eventually) How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? As a student, I was told that girls don’t fit in that world, that they just learn things by heart, and that the boys are smart and use their minds.. And that was the most ridiculous thing I heard, but it made me want to prove myself more. What do you like about your job? I love the challenges it presents; they allow me to learn and grow constantly. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes, I am. I feel like it was meant to be. I feel comfortable and confident about myself. How do you expect to grow in the future? Well, I am willing to keep learning and to inspire the new generations to follow their own steps away from all the stereotypes. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Just stick to your convictions and give it your all, you’ll be rewarded. If you want to follow Layla here is her LinkedIn and Instagram : Linkedin Instagram If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 17, 2022Interviews Women in techThis new interview in the women in tech series features Tolulope Fabunmi, a Nigerian Devops Engineer, young mother of two toddlers. Her motivation? Her sons! The financial freedom she can have working in tech, and the flexibility to share moments with her babies. A new badass mum in the women in tech team. This girl will be an amazing mentor for girls in tech in no time. I can feel how generous she is to share all her wisdom and experience. I let you discover her unique story. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? I am Tolulope Fabunmi, in my late 20s, from Nigeria, I am a DevOps Engineer and also double as a support Engineer. I am a mum to two amazing toddlers (anywhere you see me give me a warm hug). I love singing, dancing and reading. What motivated you to work in a tech field? My sons basically. I wanted to give my kids a good headstart, be financially capable while also being physically available for them thanks to the flexibility that comes with Tech. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I started homeschooling with a textbook on html my neighbour borrowed me, then I met my mentor who handed me some resources to start out with. Before I joined a bootcamp (Dufuna Codecamp to learn Software Development). After trying out Software Development for a while I wanted to do DevOps/Cloud then I joined She Code Africa and here we are. How is it to find a job in tech? Well, I would say getting an entry level job is getting harder by the day but it would happen eventually. I started out as a support Engineer because my boss was ready to take a chance on me (I am always grateful for the opportunity) Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Who never mess up hands in the air. Lol. I have gone through this a whole lot of time. I have doubted myself plenty time. But I would say I am blessed with mentors who constantly asked me to do it, make mistakes and grow. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? The funny situations would be telling people you are in tech and obviously you have a little baby strapped to your back until they hear me speak of what I know and can do. Being a woman is something, then being a mother in technology is another level. What do you like about your job? The ability to automate processes in the software Development lifecycle. Troubleshooting (even though though stressful) then helping others come on board. Are you happy with your career choice? I would always pick tech over and over again. How do you expect to grow in the future? To grow older and be a Tech sis lol. Growing to lead Engineering team and pour out all my love to the newbies. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? There is a room for you. Come on board. Its doable trust me, if I can with my big tummy and all then you can too. If you want to follow Tolulope here is her LinkedIn and Twitter: Linkedin Twitter If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed! NO PERFECT English needed! NO DEGREE needed! NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
December 16, 2022Interviews Women in techThis week’s women in tech interview features Nesrine Amrani. Nesrine is a 28 years old Product Owner, who decided to found her own company a year ago. She studied at the same Engineering School as I did, same years. I’m happy to see how brave she is to engage in such an adventure. If any of you can help her and give her some support on this journey it would be amazing.  Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Hello! My name is Nesrine, I’m 28 years old and I was born and raised in Morocco. I moved to France almost 10 years ago, and I currently live in Paris. I used to work as a product owner in tech, but I quit my job to found my company a little over a year ago. I’m a bit of a bookworm and a podcast addict, and I also enjoy the outdoors very much! What motivated you to work in a tech field? I had my mind set on becoming an engineer, and because the tech field is an ever-evolving landscape, I found excitement in the idea of working on cutting edge projects and being part of something that was never done before. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) My technological skills developed mainly at college at first, and my enthusiasm for tech kept me always on the watch for new trends. However, it was after starting my startup adventure this past year that my skills grew the most, as I came to need and develop a lot of versatile knowledge. How is it to find a job in tech? Finding “a” job in tech isn’t that hard I would say, but finding the right job for you, where you’re in adequacy with the company’s values and their business culture, is a much more complicated process. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Impostor syndrome is a reality that a majority of women experience through doubting themselves and their achievements constantly, as well as living a feeling of lack of legitimacy. I would say that it’s mainly because, as women, we’re missing that sense of rightfulness that men usually have, especially in fields where we’re a minority, and we’re therefore quick to feel as we don’t belong. Being a female CEO in the tech field holds more challenges than for our male counterparts. But in my experience, it is feminism that prevented me from developing this issue. Being aware of this phenomenon, and especially the causes that lead to it, helped me realize that it is due to societal and systemic biases, rather than some kind of lack of skills. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? It can be a challenging situation. In my past jobs, I’ve had a couple of managers call me “little missy”, I found it very demeaning, but it led me to want to prove myself even more. Today, as a female co-founder of a tech company, I embrace the fact that I’m part of a minority, as I feel part of a new wave that’s paving the way for future women to choose a career in tech, without having to think twice about it. What do you like about your job? What I love most about being an entrepreneur, is the ability to create a product from scratch, see it come to life, and experience the satisfaction of customers actually using your solution and finding value in it. Are you happy with your career choice? Eventhough it’s been a rocky road since I started my company, I’m absolutely happy and convinced with my choice! How do you expect to grow in the future? It is a fact that it takes time for startups to take off and find success. I would say that in my experience, the biggest challenge has been the uncertainty that’s felt during that time. Therefore, what I long for the most is reaching that achievement so it can be a full circle for this adventure. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? “Growth and comfort can’t ride the same horse”. This is a quote that I love because it speaks to the importance of stepping outside your comfort zone. Although the safety of a familiar situation can be reassuring, the thing with familiarity is that it won’t allow you to discover new experiences or live new challenges. Be willing to feel the fear and discomfort, it is the only way to reach your goals, and there is no shortcut around it. If you want to follow Nesrine here is her LinkedIn : Linkedin If you want to follow Nesrine’s company, here is its LinkedIn and official website : Linkedin Wordpress If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Women in tech series: interview with Nesrine Amrani This week’s women in tech interview features Nesrine Amrani. Nesrine … Sara Ounissi December 16, 2022 Women in tech series: interview with Mariam Hussein This week’s women in tech interview feature Mariam Hussein. Mariam … Sara Ounissi December 9, 2022 Women in tech series: interview with Yara Debian Welcome to this new women in tech interview featuring Yara … Sara Ounissi December 2, 2022 Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
December 7, 2021Interviews Women in techWhat a pleasure to feature Daniela in this 7th interview of the series of interviews Women in Tech. Daniela is a 30 years old web developer based in Germany. She is a career changer, so her experience can speak to people who want to change career paths but are not sure yet if they should do it and how to proceed. Also, she publishes great content on Instagram and YouTube, so make sure to check this out and follow her. She is very sweet and accessible. I’ll let you read the interview to learn more about Daniela’s experience in tech. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Hi! I’m Daniela (I go by danascript on social media so Dana is also fine :)) I recently turned 30 and I’m a Berlin based web developer What motivated you to work in a STEM field? Computer programming is the best problem-solving tool available, and I love to solve problems. I got my first Story time! So, I was initially an architect (the one that designs spaces and buildings), I have a Master’s Degree in it and a couple of years of working in the field. That was happening when I lived in Ukraine. However, due to several reasons, I’ve migrated to Germany (with the thought of continuing being an architect) but things didn’t go as planned as well as I started reconsidering my life choices. I needed a job which will fill out the main 3 criteria: 1. Be damn well paid;2. Give me a visa;3. International (not bound to country’s laws and language) – enters tech. Plus, I wanted to use the problem-solving skills I’ve used as an architect, and I’m a big fan of logic and puzzles, so coding seemed like a win-win in this regard. How did you learn your technical skills? I started step by step to first understand if that’s even what I want. I didn’t have necessarily the time to hop on another 4-year university degree as I was already in a foreign country and had bills to pay :). So after work, during the evening, I started doing bits of online courses, I recall the first one was from CodeCademy and learning the terminal. Then, through a very interesting chain of life events and people you meet at the right time and place, I got into a free coding school for 3 months (ReDi school) where I got to learn JavaScript, like really really basic. Then I met there another person who told me about another Bootcamp and after submitting my request for funding through the German government – I got the approval for a 9/12 months long Bootcamp! So my first steps were around August/September and then bootcamp I got only in September the year after, which you could imagine that I had some time to work on my own skills in between. And because I did, I dropped out of the bootcamp after a 6-7 months as I got my first job as a junior web developer! 🙂 How is it to find a job? I can definitely say that the first job is the hardest to find. The second time, I was searching for a job with some experience – MUCH easier. My recommendation – have a portfolio, put it on your CV, have a link to your GitHub profile and include your motivation/about you section! Especially if you’re a career changer! Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Oh for sure, I think this comes even deeper from the school education system and my ways of navigating it as a child. There’s this thing that if you’re not doing it like everyone else or no one tells you that you’re doing well, then you think you’re not. But you are. You are on your journey and everyone is doubting themselves. It’s probably a healthy thing, to a degree, to reflect on yourself but don’t let that stop you from achieving your goals! How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I had and sadly still have. I’m choosing my battles because sometimes they are just not worth my time, but if they are then I have loads of sarcasm in my pocket to shoot back 🙂 At the end of the day someone’s comments reflect only on their state of mind, has nothing to do with me. What do you like about your job? Well, in general I like coding for the problem solving and for the major power you have at your fingertips to create anything you want! Recently, I was dealing with an annoying task at work, so I created a tool to make it smoother for me to perform it. How cool is that?! Are you happy with your career choice? 10000% Yes! And I’m also happy I joined it at the time I did. How do you expect to grow in the future? I have two directions : the corporate one : I want to keep climbing the ladder along with the knowledge I’m gaining and the responsibilities I’m takingthe social media one : I want to reach more people and share my gained knowledge with them, to show them that they can enter tech too! What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Go for it! There are so many options and paths that I’m sure you’ll find one where you can make a great impact and enjoy it. Also – tech needs you so come on in! Follow Daniela through these platforms: YouTubeInstagramWebsite If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience Read other interviews [...]
November 30, 2021Interviews Women in techWhat a pleasure to feature Heather Noggle in this new interview series, women in tech. Heather is a 49 years old SAAS business owner (and more) from Springfield, MO, USA. To be honest, I know very few senior female programmers around me, so it is really hard to find a role model to look up to when you start working as a developer as a woman. Heather is that role model we can all have. She is so inspiring! In addition, her advice to women/girls who want to start a career in STEM is right to the point! I can’t wait for you to learn more about Heather’s experience. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Heather Noggle, 49, Springfield, MO. Role is ever fluctuating – I own a Software-as-a-Service business with a partner. We specialize in helping exporters with export compliance. I also recently started my consultancy to work in data integration, requirements gathering, and cybersecurity advocacy. Hobbies – I have a husband and two children. We like to run family 5ks. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? Computer programming is the best problem-solving tool available, and I love to solve problems. I got my first computer – a Commodore 64 – in 1984, and I spent many hours writing practical programs that would help me with my homework. How did you learn your technical skills? I am almost entirely self-taught. I took a university course in C as a lark, but I was already an established programming. How is it to find a job? I wouldn’t know! I have worked for the company I now own for 20 years. I started officially in technology as a full-time role in the late 90s, so there was the dotcom thing going on, and if you had skill, you had a job. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Absolutely! I have many moments of “how do I know how to do this” as well as “who’s going to listen to me?” How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I actually love it. Our SaaS business is woman-owned, so we’re a good mix of men and women across the board. When I worked with a consultancy, I was the only woman among the development staff, and I never felt excluded. Recently I did experience an uncomfortable situation. I went to a lunch DevOps talk, and out of 30+ people, I was the ONLY WOMAN. That was wild. What do you like about your job? There’s always an opportunity to learn. There’s always an opportunity to share, connect, and give back. Are you happy with your career choice? Very. How do you expect to grow in the future? Cybersecurity is getting really big. I’m going to be working in an advocate role, which I see as helping everyday people understand how to lock the doors appropriately while also helping the C Suite build policies that help the IT staff do their part and change the company culture to focus on cybersecurity not as a big, scary risky thing we can do nothing about but instead just another form of compliance/housekeeping with everyone doing their part. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Yes, please! There is space for you to forge your way. Focus on being wholly, authentically you. Would you like to share anything else? Do what you want to do in life. I didn’t go to school in STEM because I thought the math would be too hard, and I might be at risk to lose my scholarships. I have completed a sum total of ONE college math course. Didn’t need it to code. Business logic is logic. Follow Heather through her LinkedIn: LinkedIn If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience [...]
December 13, 2021Interviews Women in techOur 8th woman sharing her experience in tech today is our Dear Akshita. Akshita is a 26 years old Ph.D. student in Computer science. She is from India and currently studying in Georgia State University. She is very passionate about what she studies and can inspire a lot of young girls to pursue their studies in computer science. Enjoy the read. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Hey, This is Akshita. I am 26 years and come from India. Currently, I am a 4th year PhD student in Computer Science at Georgia State University. I mostly work on research in user privacy, and sometimes teach undergraduate courses in my department. During my free time, I love to draw or sing. What motivated you to study in a STEM field? I always loved working with computers, even as a kid, I was addicted to working with any application I could find on my dad’s desktop, be it MS paint or word, or games. I loved to learn how these programs work and that these programs can be actually run as applications for users to interact with, and that’s what motivated me into taking up computer engineering in my bachelor. During my Bachelors I came across several instances of my friend’s photographs being leaked on Instagram and other platforms and during this time, I came across the concept of privacy security, and this is what drove me to pursue that research in both MS and now PhD How did you learn your technical skills? Though I have done my bachelor’s in Computer engineering, I only learned basic concepts like algorithms. The actual technical skills like coding, using frameworks and API, were mostly self-taught and out of need. How are you planning to find a job? I am still a PhD student, but close to graduation, so trying to understand the job market. From my understanding, it is extremely competitive, but as long as you can prove your point and be confident about it, you should be fine. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, whether it be my MS or PhD, I always felt like I was lucky to get admitted, and completely forget about my qualifications that have led to me getting a RA or TA in the department. The constant feeling of the fact that I do not deserve this has made me go through several phases of self-doubt, and hesitation to speak, followed by overcompensating behavior which eventually led to anxiety. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Definitely, female researchers are very few, and I am lucky in a way that my advisor is also an impressive lady, and she has been able to make herself stand out there, so I try to follow her, to not feel out of place. I wouldn’t say it’s a funny situation, but whenever there are department meetings, it’s overwhelming, because most Ph.D. students and profs are men, and it is kind of intimidating. What do you like about your studies? I love that I have the creative freedom, to study and research the topic I like. I love interacting with students, teaching them and mentoring them. It gives me immense joy when I see one of my students landing a job in the industry and they talk about how certain things that I helped them with came in handy during their interviews. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes How do you expect to grow in the future? I plan on taking a research job in academia, hopefully as a research assistant professor, so that I can motivate a newer generation of students towards research in STEM, like my professor motivated me. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? I would say to not question yourself, or think you may not be tech-savvy just because you are a girl or woman. Women are doing so much in STEM to make their voices heard, so whatever you might go through, there is a chance you can always find another woman who has gone through and can gladly direct you on the right path. Also, I will say women have the added advantage of being extremely passionate, which trust me comes in very handy in research, dealing with students, and several other situations. If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience Read other interviews [...]
November 22, 2021Interviews Women in techLet us continue our series of interviews Women experience in STEM with the testimony of Sera. I happened to exchange some messages with her on social media, as I saw that she lives in the Netherlands. I wanted to know more about her experience in the country at that time. Sera was very kind to answer my questions and reassured me on many points. On top of that, she publishes great technical content on Instagram. Sera’s experience is a great example for people who want to change careers and work in tech. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? I am Sera a Software Developer at Adidas. I come from Italy but I lived in the UK, Germany, China and I am currently based in the Netherlands. I love designer items, traveling and puzzling (Sudoku and coding algorithm also count 😉). What motivated you to work in a STEM field? As Product Owner, I worked with many inspiring engineers. A few years ago, they sparked my interest in more technical topics and eventually inspired me to switch to a technical career last year. How is it to find a job? Competitive if you don’t have much experience. However, with some practice and preparation, you will find some opportunities to grow in the field. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Sometimes. When I feel I am not adequately prepared, I interpret it as a sign to gain more knowledge rather than a letdown. It’s about managing my expectations and being kind to myself. If I don’t know something, I study it. Until I like it, I will keep on doing it. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? My colleagues contributed to where I’m at now. I didn’t experience uncomfortable situations. More points of view in tech are still needed but I didn’t feel resistance against it in the context I worked in. Diversity is encouraged and actively sought. What do you like about your job? Logic. Immediate feedback on work. The possibilities to learn are endless. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes How do you expect to grow in the future? Keep on learning is continuous growth. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Do more of what scares you, have a positive outlook on life and keep on learning. Anything else you would like to share? If you want to follow my journey in tech connect with me on IG @codewithsera If you want to follow Sera here is her Instagram : Instagram If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience [...]
December 30, 2022Interviews Women in techI’m so excited to share with you the final interview in my “Women in Tech” series for the year. This one is with Laureline Paris, a 30-year-old career shifter from Paris. She’s a really interesting and inspiring woman in the tech industry, and in this interview, you’ll get to learn about her experiences, insights, and advice. The interview covers a bunch of different topics, like Laureline’s background, her current role and responsibilities, the challenges she’s faced as a woman in tech, and her advice for other women looking to enter or advance in the industry. Whether you’re considering a career in tech, looking for some inspiration and guidance, or just curious about what it’s like to be a woman in tech, this interview is definitely worth a read. Thanks for following along with the “Women in Tech” series this year. I hope you’ve found these interviews as interesting and inspiring as I have. See you next year for more! Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Alohaa 🙌 My name is Laureline Paris, 30 years old from Paris and I am today a JavaScript developer I’ve always been attracted by creativity and discovered computer quite late: the combo of those two made a perfect sense for me and this is where I am. My hobbies are drawing/painting/animating digitally or learn more about programming. What motivated you to work in a tech field? What motivated me was being able to understand the tool that allowed me to do what I loved to do with and to dive deeper into this for better understanding its complexity. As far as I know this is my curiosity and strong will to create whatever I want that brought me to who and where I am today. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I’ve learnt about code at La Capsule bootcamp in Paris when I got the opportunity to switch career ( I’ve done various jobs positions in restauration, hostels with a side project to get involved with creating things through digital painting ) How is it to find a job in tech? With few years of experience, this opens a lot of opportunities and interviews propositions through LinkedIn and others. But tough regarding the whole recruitment process a developper has to do. Regarding beginners: it could be tough, as most of the job offers do consider junior but with 2 years of experience – which is, in some ways, contradictory I think. However it is still possible ( even without diploma – I can tell ). In that field, it is a matter of being able to show what you know with concrete projects Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? I think the imposter syndrome is still here somewhere. Having a non traditional path through IT, maybe lacking knowledge about the vast world of computers and internet can create the need to understand our worth on the market and as a developer – especially when one just started her/his career. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I did not encounter too many of these situations; at least nothing about intimidation or other things of the kind. The one time I kind of encountered a situation where I was depicted as a women was at some job interviews where it is a trend to hire people for their “minority” aspect. I felt like I was interviewed and/or had that interview because I was a woman in tech, when I just wanted to be evaluated as a person with the skills they are looking for. Once, I’ve asked about what did get their attention for my profile and the person did talk more about the minority aspects than the skills I had; the person was not able to talk about the skills I gathered so far besides evasive words about my career path. What do you like about your job? Learning everyday, the feeling to be in a limitless ocean where everything is reachable if one takes the time to understand and/or lean it, I love being confronted to algorithmic problematics and the creativity that both programming languages and front-end implementations, for instance, are offering. Are you happy with your career choice? I am definitely happy for that career choice – I just wish I was aware of it sooner. Who inspires you? Who are your mentors and why? Everyone really. Everything we have today is thanks to everyone contributing. I am not someone that chooses one person however I am grateful for every resources we have, for people I met in the tech or not in the tech. – it is just a question of perspective and how one moves her/his next pawn to move forward in their own life. How do you expect to grow in the future? I love being polyvalent and to work with various tools as they are not entirely incompatible between them. The perspectives I have is to be able to build whatever I want/need to do, continue on my polyvalent path with python, javascript, shell, mongodb, sql, or whatever tool that could help in my position as a developper, and finally helping others in this field if I can 🙂 What’s the best piece of advice that you’ve ever received? Have a break. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? If it is something that you like, if you like to constantly learn new things – go for it! Make your own path to get what you want and overall, give yourself that shot! It’s possible. If you want to follow Laureline here are her LinkedIn, GitHub and Behance : Linkedin Github Behance If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
December 29, 2021Interviews Women in techOur 9th interview in the series Women Experience in tech features a dear colleague and friend of mine. Nezha is a Lead QA working in Paris. I started to work with Nezha during my first job as a junior developer. We were working on a very complicated app and she was on the testing team. She was doing her job so well that sometimes I hated that she was that good. I would add a new feature and try to handle every case scenario. However, Nezha was always able to find the case that would highlight a bug or unexpected behavior. Then I would have to go again through my code and fix everything. At the same time, I was happy to rely on her for the testing part because she would help me as a junior developer to improve my code and make it stronger so she won’t break it. On top of that she was so sweet and smart, we connected instantly and became friends. It was a pleasure to meet her in Paris a year later to chit-chat and eat delicious food in this great city. I’ll let you discover more about Nezha’s experience in QA testing. I am very happy to count her in this series of amazing women in tech. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Hello, my name is Nezha and I am Lead QA for 3 months. Before that, I was QA Analyst for 4 years. I am 33 years old and I am originally from Morocco, but I grew up in Belgium. I’ve been living in Paris for 5 years now. I am passionate about the ukulele, travel, and my cat “Velours”. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? I’ve always been passionate about technology. My father gave me my first computer when I was 7 years old. The first thing I did was memorize the keyboard. I was convinced that one day, I would be a developer… But first thing first: I had to know the keyboard by heart! I quickly changed my mind when we had the Internet for the first time at home. I knew it was way harder than that. But that didn’t stop me. I learned to code C++ when I was 15 years old. I was in computer science branch in high school. After that, I went to university, where I took psychology courses. I regretted giving up computer science because that was (and still is) what I love the most. Once I finished my studies, I took the opportunity to work in startups. And here I am! How did you learn your technical skills? Surprisingly, my educational background didn’t help me that much. As technologies evolved, everything I had learned in school was outdated. Nevertheless, it helped me understand the complexity of my role in a team. I knew I had to work hard to improve my work. Thank God, I had great colleagues to interact with. I passed certifications and, for the technical part, I took JS courses on freeCodeCamp and will soon start JS courses on Test Automation University and Cypress courses on LinkedIn Learning. How is it to find a job? I think I was very lucky because I arrived at the right time, in the right place. There were a lot of opportunities in STEM in Paris when I arrived until 2019. With the pandemic, I think it’s much more difficult. But I hope it will change quickly, I remain positive. Although the most complicated thing is to find the job in which you’ll flourish. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes, I am living it now. But I avoid letting my negative thoughts get to me. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? It’s hard being a woman in STEM. I often feel like women have to prove twice as much as men that they deserve their place. If we fail, we are quickly judged as “incapable.” Whereas, for men, failure is seen as “a lesson for next time”. The way we communicate is different, too. I’m not saying this is always the case, but it frequently happens that these issues prevent many women from thriving in STEM. What do you like about your job? What I like the most about my job is the challenges, the responsibilities, the teamwork, the satisfaction of creating a good product. Are you happy with your career choice? Pretty damn happy, yes! How do you expect to grow in the future? I would like to focus on the technical part of my job and develop my skills as an automatician. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? Be positive, be brave, be fierce! Hard work pays off. Would you like to share anything else? I had the amazing chance to work with The Trendycoder and I wish to everyone to have a colleague like her <3 If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience Read other interviews [...]
November 25, 2022Interviews Women in techIn this number of the Women in tech series, we discover the experience of Safae ABOU EL QASSIME. Safae is a 30 years old Product Manager originally from Morocco, living and working in France. We studied in the same engineering school from 2013 to 2017, but not in the same measure. I don’t think we connected at that time, but I’ll be happy to now. I’m very proud to see my fellow Polytech colleagues succeed. Wishing you the best. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My name is Safae, I am 30 years old. I’m from France, originally from Morocco. Today I work as a Product Manager in the In Vitro Diagnostics. I love fashion, mixing, matching.. It’s a way to express myself ! What motivated you to work in a tech field? Solving problems was my main motivation. To take risks, and challenge myself to solve problems. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) Colleagues, school, Self training. How is it to find a job in tech? It was not easy at the beginning. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? No, I didn’t. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? As a funny situation, Two years ago I was in a company where the head of product managers and the director of dev are women. So we (as women) started to impose on ourselves. What do you like about your job? I want to make a difference, to create, innovate and improve the daily life of my clients. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes, completely How do you expect to grow in the future? Head of product management in short-term. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Go ahead, trust yourself. If you want to follow Safae here is her LinkedIn: Linkedin If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
December 2, 2022Interviews Women in techThis number of Women in tech series features Akua Opong. Akua is a senior Analyst based in the UK. “She doesn’t rest” is what people say about her, and I understand why. You will be impressed by the number of things she does for the community. Her pieces of advice are so wise, I will try to follow most of them. I’ll let you discover this amazing interview. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? My name is Akua and I am based in London, UK. My family are from Ghana, West Africa. I studied at the University of Surrey with a degree in Computing and IT. I completed a work placement in Infrastructure Support for Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd. I am a Chartered IT Professional through the British Computer Society, a STEM Ambassador, Board Advisor, DEI Lead and Mentor Health Advocate. Outside my daily role as a Senior Analyst at LSEG, I am a fundraiser, a charity volunteer and a keen sports volunteer for Netball England and British Athletics. What motivated you to work in a tech field? Initially growing up I wanted to be a paediatrician and I then looked at working in the army in emergency response (but with an IT intelligence role).  My first job outside of university was working for Carphone Warehouse, while others were selling products, I was troubleshooting laptop issues and mobile phone queries. I always like fixing things as a child whether at home or in my spare time. I am a problem solver, dreamer and explorer. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) Over the years, I believe in Continuous learning: learning a new skills even if it is 15-30 minutes a day learning a programming language.  Use a growth mindset to improve and this is essential in the tech industry. I learn through webinars, events, books, self-taught and online resources. I am Neurodiversive (self identifies as Dyslexic and has ADHD), so need variety as a visual learner and use the pomodoro technique with focused time. How is it to find a job in tech? It was quite tough, as I graduated during a recession and even after completing a placement year it did take a while. Perservance and commitment gave me the drive I needed to find my first IT role. My first IT job was supporting the Dubai Royal family across their UK properties; I worked at Rathbones for nearly five years, then PA Consulting and fast forward to July 2019, I joined LSEG. At LSEG, I work in the Desktop Services Team within Corporate Technology; it is very fast-paced, which I love. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Sometimes due to imposter syndrome, I didn’t fully take advantage of the opportunities and connections as I was lacking confidence. In the last five years through charity work, volunteering, joining D&I networks, LinkedIn contacts plus self-discovery has helped me a lot. All these skills have taken me to a new level or to a new area of opportunity that I wished I had known when I first started out in my career. There are times in life where you hit a stumbling block but you need to keep going and just preserve. Always remember your why? Be open to multiple possibilities, don’t allow imposter syndrome or a lack of confidence to stop you. Be brave enough to go for it! How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? Life is a journey where you will have struggles and have to overcome different challenges. I want to break down those barriers and remove those stereotypes that you can and will succeed regardless of your gender or background. From a young age, I was constantly setting goals, whether career, personal or financial goals, in terms of what I wanted to achieve. Even when I would feel anxious or distracted by negative thoughts, I would have a self–talk and recognise that the sum of our life is often made up of a lot of small, meaningful, everyday moments—versus huge, momentous, next-level feelings of joy. I know my capabilities and what I want to achieve; I will keep working to achieve that goal and show others what you can achieve, however big or small. I do not want to be labelled or stereotyped, but each role or opportunity is based on merit and due to hard work. What do you like about your job? Each day is different, I like to plan my day using the Pomodoro technique where I focus on the hard tasks first then work on the simple tasks, but sometimes use Time boxing (a project planning technique). It is fast paced but I want a great work/life balance. Are you happy with your career choice? Yes, as Technology evolves all the time. I can work in support now then in Project Management then move to CyberSecurity in the future. So many wonderful options where I can apply my skills. How do you expect to grow in the future? I want to be involved in project management next and then cyber security in the defence industry. I have a big focus on mental health, being a STEM ambassador, and on diversity and inclusion. I am currently working on being a trustee for a women’s charity or social enterprise linked to giving chldren a better education by 2024 and part of communities that will enhance my knowledge. I want to be a philanthropist/humanitarian where I use technology to drive sustainable development goals and social impact, and to raise awareness of neurodiversity. This will enable young girls to achieve their goals in STEM through mentorship. I enjoy variety as you learn more about the wider world. Just remember your wellbeing and to use your words for kindness. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Never lose yourself. Put your forward to be your advocate and cheerleader that shows self-belief. “For me, becoming isn’t about arriving somewhere or achieving a certain aim. I see it instead as forward motion, a means of evolving, a way to reach continuously toward a better self. The journey doesn’t end,” Michelle Obama wrote in her memoir Becoming. I chose this quote as I attended the Becoming book tour at the O2 in London. Michelle Obama is a massive advocate for young girls to be given a chance to succeed regardless of their background. Each person should be given opportunities, in a world that is fair and equal. It is about uplift, empowering and not about competing with each other, but working for each other – for the young girl or woman’s voice to be heard. Would you like to share anything else? If you speak to my family and friends, they would say, “She doesn’t rest!” My key hobbies and interests are sports and charity volunteering through Crohn’s, British Athletics, Netball England, and working as a STEM ambassador for school initiatives. It is all about community and giving back. I love reading a mixture of development, thought-provoking books in my downtime, from Michelle Obama’s Becoming to Untamed by Glenn Doyle, emotional intelligence and feminist books. I recommend She Speaks: The power of women’s voices by Yvette Cooper. I enjoy travelling, the spa, listening to music, the theatre and concerts. I am a massive Boyz II Men, Toni Braxton, Destiny’s Child and Bruno Mars fan. A personal career highlight is being featured in the Tech London Advocates book – The Voices in the shadows (Volume 1). These highlights black women in Technology and helps give young girls/women the encouragement of what they can become in the future. If you want to follow Akua here is her LinkedIn and Linktree : Linkedin Link If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
October 14, 2022Interviews Women in techThe women in tech interview series is back! It’s been a while since I haven’t shared an interview. For the comeback, it is a pleasure for me to share the story of Maisie. She is my second guest writer on TheTrendyCoder, if you haven’t read her article, here it is. Advice from my pre-bootcamp self. Our cooperation on this first article was great, I really wish to publish more from her. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Hello, I’m Maisie, 40 years old, living in beautiful Western Scotland. I will soon be starting my first software role and am super excited! What motivated you to work in a tech field? After university, I drifted into a career in Project Controls, which I had been doing for about 15 years. This was a good career and I’ve worked with lots of lovely people, but I always felt like a generalist and knew I wanted to do something more technical. Reading articles about the tech industry and skills shortage inspired me to take action. How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) I started learning Python with CodeFirstGirls in 2021, and enjoyed it so much I went on to do their other Kickstarter courses and the FullStack CFGDegree. I’ve also done other online courses such as ZTM but I think it’s definitely the CFGDegree that has opened the door to a new career. How is it to find a job in tech? It’s definitely hard and I had to remember that every “no” takes you closer to a “yes”! Don’t underestimate the power of your pre-tech experience: if you have worked in another field there will probably be heaps of transferable skills. I also got the help of a career coach to rework my CV for the career I wanted in the future and I’m sure this helped. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Who doesn’t? What keeps me right is reminding myself that I always feel that way when I start a new job, activity, or anything. But a year later I’ll think “why was I so worried”. Looking back at everything I’ve already done helps a lot too. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? I’ve always worked in the construction / engineering industry so I’m used to it now. I remember going on a course once where there was about 30 people and only 2 females! So it doesn’t really bother me on a day-to-day basis. I’m very happy the industry is becoming more diverse, albeit not as quickly as it might. What do you like about your job? I’m just finishing one role and transitioning to another, but my favourite moments are always when I manage to fix something for a colleague. That could be just in Excel or SharePoint, going forward it will be in Python or SQL. Problem-solving is definitely my favourite thing especially when it helps someone else or saves them some repetitive work! Are you happy with your career choice? Ask me in a month’s time when I’ve started! Right now I’m very happy. How do you expect to grow in the future? I have so much to learn and I can’t wait, whether that’s back-end or front-end, I’m also really interested in cyber-security and want to learn more about that too. I’m doing another Mobile Apps course later this year. When I see all the online courses just waiting for me, it makes me so happy and excited, I’d rather study than watch TV these days. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Don’t even think – just start somewhere and see where it leads you. I should have done this years ago. If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 18, 2022Interviews Women in techIn this women in tech interview, we discover the story of the incredible Tochukwu Peace Egbuna Aka Tochi Pearl. She is a young Data Analyst. Yes Tochi, 26 is young even if you think it’s not. Her testimony is very sincere and authentic. She tells us about her motivations, her doubts, her problems, and expectations to grow in the future. Our journey into tech is not always easy, but it is a journey worth to be taken anyway. Could you start with a small presentation, so we can get to know you better? Oh hi there, my name is Tochukwu Peace Egbuna but I prefer to be called Tochi Pearl (the unofficial name that I have.. lol). I recently turned 26( I’m an oldie right?), anyways, I’m 26 and I’m proudly an Anambra baby. I’m from Idemili South in Anambra and I’m the second child of 7(I don’t really like the position because everybody is looking up to you for inspiration and I’m scared to not provide the right motivation). I’m a data analyst, started out 2 years ago. Upon graduation, I was super confused on what to do with my life being that I wrote codes that ran only on paper in uni. The struggle was real, I was just about to go and learn a skill before I got an internship to be a data analyst (I didn’t know jack, so the struggle was even worse because nobody comes to teach you anything and results were being expected from you, took on my first challenge to learn SQL as I was going to be interacting with databases a lot), yes, here we are! When I’m not cleaning data, analyzing them or visualizing them, I love to read or be on my phone, Twitter especially for all of the gbas gbos that comes with it. I’m a tech Jesus baby. I couldn’t have come this far without His help. What motivated you to work in a tech field? My elder sister was a strong motivation for me, seeing her do all she did motivated me and coming from a computer science background from school and learning how to code on paper, she motivated me to actually learn. Oh and of course, the money motivated me too! How did you learn your technical skills? (self-taught, college, bootcamp…) Self-taught. Did a lot of personal learnings. Because I had to deliver, I had to learn. How is it to find a job in tech? I think it is difficult. I’ve applied and I’m still applying for better roles. Once I had an interview, i got to the second stage only to hear they didn’t need the role anymore. Can be mentally disturbing. But we move regardless Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? Yes. A lot too. When I started, I didn’t know jack about data analysis. I got a paid internship which means I had to deliver. I felt I didn’t fit in, i felt I didn’t belong there. I almost did quit, there were other women in my company who already knew their onion which made matters worse, I wanted my voice to be heard, I wanted to contribute in meetings but I didn’t know anything. How do you feel about being a minority in tech as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? No not really. Where I started my internship gave room for diversity and encouraged women a lot. What do you like about your job? I think I like that I can give insights from data that I see. I just love that I can help with decision making. Are you happy with your career choice? Well, I’d almost want to say yes but I’m thinking I want to switch to software engineering. It feels like they’re the only people being recognized. How do you expect to grow in the future? I expect to grow with communities, I think communities push you the most. Communities, friends, volunteering to mentor other ladies, taking on new challenges and of course, taking courses. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in tech? Just start. I know the odds are almost not in your favour, but just start. You can look out for women communities and join to stay inspired. There would be burn outs too, but just keep at it and don’t forget to take breaks where necessary. If you want to follow Tochi here is her Twitter : Twitter If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Student Professional Tools I use for this site I buy all my domain names on  Namecheap, as thetrendycoder.com The hosting of this website is made on Bluehost. The website is created with WordPress.org (and not WordPress.com). I use the page builder Elementor because it makes it easy to create modern pages with drag and drop. I have multiple websites, and on most of them, I use themes from wpKoi. I love their design, they are very original and work well with Elementor. All the designs and images are created using canvas. I use Grammarly and languagetool to correct all my spelling and grammar mistakes. SEO is a big thing on a website, I use a WordPress plugin called YoastSEO to help me with the basic analysis. I also use a tool called Keysearch for choosing the right keywords. To handle affiliate links, I use two platforms: impact and ShareASale. You want to write on TheTrendyCoder ? If you are interested in publishing guest articles on this website, sharing your experience or coding tutorials, apply through this form. NO EXPERIENCE needed!NO PERFECT English needed!NO DEGREE needed!NO AGE limits! No matter at what stage we are in our tech journey, we all have learned things and experienced things. Sharing them can help others and even help us. So, if you are a student, a professional, or a self-taught coder, feel at home and share some of your knowledge with the community. Women in tech See more More resources See more More cheatsheets More cheatsheets [...]
November 26, 2021Interviews Women in techContinuing the series Women experience in STEM with the interview of Suchandra. Her interest in technology started very young and let her to study computer science. Even if she is still a student, she has very wise and proactive advice for people who want to start a career in tech. I am happy to be sharing her experience with you. Could you start by a small presentation so we can get to know you better? Hi, my name is Suchandra, I am an M.Sc. computer science student from India. What motivated you to work in a STEM field? Since childhood, I’ve been fascinated with physics, computer software, and technology. My creative side and logical thinking capabilities both found expression in coding, so naturally, it motivated me to become a software developer. As you are still a student, How is it to find an internship? I’ve completed 2 internships. Finding internships as a fresher was hard at first but soon I learned how to tailor a resume, build a portfolio, and showcase skills that would make me a good fit for the role. Have you experienced imposter syndrome? If yes, could you tell us a little about it? As a girl in STEM, I’ve always faced imposter syndrome. Over time, I learned how to just ignore the constant nagging voice saying I’m not enough. Connecting with other girls in STEM helped me a lot! It made me feel like I belong to the tech world, even though it’s still heavily male-dominated. How do you feel about being a minority in STEM as a female? Have you had any uncomfortable situations to share? Or a funny situation? The lack of representation of minority girls and women in STEM or the tech world makes tech highly biased, discourages women from joining the field and there is a lack of talent recognition. Since programmers create apps to be used by millions, it only makes sense to have diverse devs on the team to make sure the product is inclusive and unbiased. What do you like about your studies? I’m interested in data science and all its applications fascinate me like chatbots driverless cars GANs and so much more. There’s something new to learn every day! Are you happy with your career choice? Yes definitely. How do you expect to grow in the future? With proper efforts, I hope to learn the skills and competence needed to be a successful software developer. What would you say to a girl/woman who wants to start a career in STEM? I would like to say all the things I wished someone had told me at the start : Get a supportive peer group from whom you can share learn and grow together Keep up with the latest trends from blogs news etc…Build projects and real-life applications of whatever it is you’re learning.Be happy when you run into errors or things break. Failures are needed to learn deep. Document your learning experience write blogs or teach others what you’re learning as teaching is like learning twice. All the best to everyone starting out on their STEM journey! If you want to follow Suchandra here is her Instagram : Instagram If you also want to share your experience as a female student or professional in tech, don’t hesitate to fill in the form linked below. It is a great chance to be featured in our next interviews posts and inspire other girls and women to join us. Submit your experience [...]
TheTrendyBrand